Invisible Sun by Monte Cook Games

A section for showing off and promoting new or upcoming gaming products not currently available. **Posts for products which have been released will be moved to other forums.**
Post Reply
Cloak-n-Dagger
Posts: 352
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 3:55 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Contact:

Invisible Sun by Monte Cook Games

Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:02 pm

Ok, so apparently MCG has put out a kickstarter for their next new game, it's called Invisible Sun and I...honestly don't know what to think of it, but I'm leaning towards overblown pile of RPG rubbish and to be honest, I don't know anything about game aside from the video intro on the KS page.

Here's a link, just for SnGs: Invisible Sun KS

Before I get to the jaw dropping, WTF part of this whole thing, here's some info taken from the KS page:
Invisible Sun is a tabletop roleplaying game of surreal fantasy. It’s dark. It’s moody. It’s adult. It’s also perhaps the most deluxe and amazing roleplaying game product ever produced. Inside the specially designed cube you will find four books, a folding game board, a resin monolith, a metal medallion, four special dice, player handouts, tokens, and hundreds of cards to enhance your gameplay.

Invisible Sun is a game of secrets. And that is true of both the physical product and the in-world game as it is played. Hidden within the pages of the books, within the components of the game, and perhaps even within the box itself, lie clues to discover—clues that can unlock new secrets. Invisible Sun is as much about interacting with the physical game itself as it is about interacting with the other players. This is a game of deep immersion. Of escape.

Let’s be upfront, though. Invisible Sun is not a game for everyone. Not because it’s difficult, but because it’s involved. It’s not really designed for casual, fire-and-forget sorts of play. It is character-focused the way a good novel or television series is character-focused, with individual story arcs, deep development, complex motivations, nonlinear narratives, and asymmetrical play. If you’re the kind of player who enjoys musing over your character between sessions, thinking deeply about the setting and events in the game, and making interesting choices, then Invisible Sun is the game you’ve been waiting for all this time.
The place where you sit, reading this right now, is a place called Shadow. Despite what you may think, this is not the real world, but a shadow of it.

The real world is a place called the Actuality. This is a strange, surreal setting where magic is real and the impossible is entirely possible. It’s a dark place of demons, ghosts, and far stranger things, but it’s also a place of wonder and light—angels of the Legacy and continually shapeshifting elderbrin—where magic can do astonishing things.

In the Actuality, the player characters are important people who, should they discover the right secrets and find the right spells, can make a difference in the world.

And what a world. This is a place where tight-lipped veterans of the War won’t speak of their experiences, but it’s well known that the central city of Satyrine still bears wounds where undetonated weapons of pure hatred keep it from healing. Soulless devils scheme in darkness, bartering for bits of soul, because without one, magic is impossible. Spiders crawl into bedrooms to sip at the fluids in a sleeper’s eyes, carrying a magical virus that can cause anyone or anything to sprout spidery legs and scuttle about. Vislae visit changeries to alter their appearance to suit their mood—sometimes into striking, inhuman, and not even entirely Euclidean forms. They attend intrigue-filled parties held within the consciousness of the hosts, or search through the ruins of ancient libraries to find the ghosts of books they need to read.

The Actuality and the magical systems in Invisible Sun were designed from scratch. Don’t know anything about historical or modern magical traditions or occult beliefs? That’s okay. In fact it’s great. Because the magic and the occult in Invisible Sun has no ties to any real world beliefs. Monte took literally decades of study in such things—tarot, Kabbalah, Vodun, astrology, numerology, mythology, religion, the Tree of Life, and so on—and built an entirely original occult system for the setting. With Invisible Sun, we avoid any baggage from our world and our lives so we can dive into this purely escapist fantasy. (If you do have some knowledge of this sort of thing, well, you’ll likely really appreciate what he’s done.)
More or less, that's the gist of this new "RPG", however, you realize quickly (and to note, they do say that such a game requires paying a premium because it's so awesome :roll: ) that this almost comes off as a snake oil pitch.

The entry pledge for the base game....$197.00

Yeah...$200 for an RPG..

...an RPG of magic and wonder that comes with board game-like components and can be played at the table or away from it and tailors to any person's life style or play style....REALLY?

So from the initial pledge of $197, it then jumps up to $539 in which case you then get the game, all stretch goal books and some other stuff plus access to something called the Direct Campaign which means for 12 months, Monte himself will give you stuff whether physical or electronic to direct your group's campaign, not to mention you get a secret, some secret about the game or the world.

From there the prices jump to $1,475 and then the penultimate $5,912. These upper tiers have you working with MCG and being in the early play tests and such.

I just don't even know where to begin honestly, it's so ludicrous I can't believe folks are actually pledging this thing. The whole game is this giant black cardboard folding cube that you open up and everything is tucked and hidden away inside.
invsun.jpg

Personally it comes of as way gimmicky and just over the top. To each his own and all that, but if someone opened up this monstrosity to me and said, "Hey lets play this role-playing game." I'd probably bust out laughing. It reminds me so much of the attempt by FFG to produce Warhammer 3rd edition as some RPG/board game hybrid and that seriously tanked after the first year. I have a suspicion that in the end, this will just end up getting played a few times then sat up on a shelf to collect dust.

Here's a play video, I see nothing in this that requires paying $197 as an entry fee or that couldn't have been achieved by putting this out in standard books with charts to roll instead of game board components or at the minimum a deck of special cards, but that's just my 2cps.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

Ancalagon
Posts: 305
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:44 pm
Location: Nebraska

Post by Ancalagon » Tue Aug 16, 2016 8:06 pm

What pretentious drivel. Sounds like it was written by authors rejected by White Wolf back in the World of Darkness heyday. Fools and their money are soon parted.

Cloak-n-Dagger
Posts: 352
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 3:55 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Contact:

Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Wed Aug 17, 2016 8:41 pm

Yeah, there seem to be a fair number of folks who feel the same way. I think this one will come and then go the way of the Dodo.
“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

Captain_Blood
Posts: 69
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 4:35 pm
Location: Texas

Post by Captain_Blood » Tue Aug 23, 2016 1:05 am

I've already played and own another better game that this is trying to be
[media]
[/media]

Ancalagon
Posts: 305
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:44 pm
Location: Nebraska

Post by Ancalagon » Tue Aug 23, 2016 8:10 pm

Now THAT brings back some memories 8-)

Cloak-n-Dagger
Posts: 352
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2016 3:55 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Contact:

Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Sat Aug 27, 2016 2:22 pm

HeroQuest is definitely a classic. I owned it back in the day too but never had the chance to get in play time as much as I would have liked.
“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

Captain_Blood
Posts: 69
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 4:35 pm
Location: Texas

Post by Captain_Blood » Sun Sep 04, 2016 1:10 am

I have it for Table Top Simulator :) If you happen to have TTS I'd be happy to bring you in on a game.

Post Reply