Coeur de Lion

A place for DMs, GMs, or players to post stories, play reports, or general info about their current or ongoing campaigns.
Ancalagon
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Re: Coeur de Lion

Post by Ancalagon » Tue Aug 30, 2016 12:54 am

Deil the Yin wrote:Great flavour for a game, going beyond just "gold pieces" etc...

I've also adopted the mathematical accounting of the coin types (ie 12 pennies/copper = 1 shilling/silver) with silver being the most common/base coin, but also have the differing alloys genearlly and created varying nomenclatures for the denominations based on the different culture-types and races (eg shilling/guinnea/farthing/rigoel). Looks complicated but is still quite simplistic... I think.
Gamers (and non-gamers) are so accustomed to the base 10 monetary system that it can seem like a foreign language switching to something different. Once players work with pennies, shillings, pounds, etc for a couple of sessions they should be able to pick up on it pretty easily. 8-)



Captain_Blood
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Post by Captain_Blood » Sun Sep 04, 2016 12:20 am

I like the idea of restricting HP. One of the problems I had with later editions of a game that shall not be mentioned was that HP seemed to flow like water for both PCs and Monsters. It had the effect that lower level monsters (orcs, goblins, kobolds, etc) were really nothing more than pests that could be handled by a farmer and his family in any grouping smaller than a war party. Higher level monsters on the other hand were just as powerful as actual (Demi)Gods. Of course they had to be since the PCs were as well by that point.

I'm wondering how your system will play at levels 6-10 though. Have you gone too far in restricting HP? If level 5 is supposed to represent the true BAMFs of the world a party of them should be able to tackle some pretty hefty things. I guess what I'm getting at is this: how many more average "hits" should a character be able to take as he advances? This is something I'd really like to play test.

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Thu Sep 08, 2016 10:59 pm

Captain_Blood wrote:<snip> I'm wondering how your system will play at levels 6-10 though. Have you gone too far in restricting HP? If level 5 is supposed to represent the true BAMFs of the world a party of them should be able to tackle some pretty hefty things. I guess what I'm getting at is this: how many more average "hits" should a character be able to take as he advances? This is something I'd really like to play test.
In all honesty, I'm not too concerned with levels 6-10. I'm thinking 1-5 or 6 will be the optimal range. With the notions I have regarding the passage of time and rate of advancement, not too many characters will approach 10th level without some supernatural help....

I'll be looking to conduct some play testing down the road with my group here. Maybe I could run a demo at a convention some time. Ideas that sound good on paper may, or may not, play out well. Time will tell. ;)

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Fri Sep 09, 2016 12:02 am

Defense and Armour

The standard Armor Class system will be renamed Defense or Defense Score or some such. It will be an ascending scale a la C&C but start at a base 12 rather than a base 10 and modified by DEX (trying to dodge) and shield (interposing a mobile barrier between you and the incoming attack) as normal. As you can see, a Defense score won't be super high in most cases so that no one will be unhittable. If you can't dodge an attack or block it with a shield then a high enough attack roll will hit you. The armour worn will serve to protect you from the attack by functioning as damage reduction a la WFRP2e - not make a defender harder to hit as in C&C. I'm still playing with the values of the damage reduction.

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Sun Sep 18, 2016 9:15 pm

Ancalagon wrote:Defense and Armour

The standard Armor Class system will be renamed Defense or some such. It will be an ascending scale a la C&C but start at a base 12 rather than a base 10 and modified by DEX (trying to dodge) and shield (interposing a mobile barrier between you and the incoming attack) as normal. As you can see, a Defense score won't be super high in most cases so that no one will be unhittable. If you can't dodge an attack or block it with a shield then a high enough attack roll will hit you. The armour worn will serve to protect you from the attack by functioning as damage reduction a la WFRP2e - not make a defender harder to hit as in C&C. I'm still playing with the values of the damage reduction.
I'm rolling around the idea of opposed rolls for attack and defense like the current HackMaster.

As a player, would you
1) prefer a static defense and wait to see if an attacker scores high enough to hit you
or
2) roll a d20 +/- any mods and compare to a d20 +/- any mods from the attacker to see who scores the highest?

This inquiring mind wants to know!

Cloak-n-Dagger
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Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Tue Sep 20, 2016 3:50 pm

I think active rolls are nice and help keep the players engaged in the fight. In a passive defense it's basically sit around and wait for the DM to roll through, with the active defense, the players still have dice to roll and that, imo, is a good thing.
“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:30 pm

Players love rolling dice so I was thinking if I can incorporate opposed rolls then so much the better. I broke out a couple of sets of dice on Sunday night and started experimenting with results using system ideas I've come up with. I think it has some potential without getting too crunchy.

Captain_Blood
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Post by Captain_Blood » Sun Oct 02, 2016 1:49 pm

All of my experience with opposed attack/defense checks, outside of grapple rules, has been at conventions. I've found them to be fun for small groups, but awful for mid and large size. Things slow down far too much. Good players that understand the mechanic or pick it up quickly nullify this compliant.

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Mon Oct 10, 2016 2:16 pm

Maybe I'll present both options in the final write up: one for the standard target number as AC and one for opposed rolls. Maybe play testing will sway me one way or another. :lol:

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Wed Oct 26, 2016 7:58 pm

Coeur de Lion – Wizards & Spellcasting

Ancient History

Thousands of year ago, humans slowly developed the ability to harness the magickal energies of the world around them. How this first began none now can say. The few men and women wise enough to grasp the processes of utilizing magick became known as wizards by those in wonderment and terror around them. Through means of meditation, words of power, and other practices enabling them to enter into trance-like states, those early wizards were able to draw from their surroundings and imprint upon their minds magickal power that could later be triggered for a desired effect. The imprints of magickal power eventually became referred to as spells.

Triggering the desired effect from a magickal imprint was an arduous process that required early wizards to possess freedom of movement in order to properly direct the effect, specific materials that somehow interact with and help focus the power of the magick, and uninterrupted concentration necessary to convert the imprint into the desired effect. If all three components of the triggering process were executed properly, which is by no means guaranteed, then the spell takes effect. Over time this process became known as casting since many of the different spell effects seemed to emanate from, to be cast forth by, the wizard. After a spell is cast, the magickal imprint was no longer present upon the wizard’s mind and had to again be prepared for use if so desired.


Game Mechanics for Vancian Spell Casting EDIT on 15-Aug-17

It is absolutely essential for wizards to possess high intelligence to more capably perform in their chosen class. In order to successfully cast a spell using the traditional (Vancian) system, a casting roll is required. The casting roll is a INT check using a d20 with a penalty equal to the level of the spell attempted. If the check passes, then the spell operates normally. If the check fails, the the wizard failed to control the magick and something unexpected happens. This called by some a misfire or a miscast. The DM will determine the exact effect of a misfired spell. E.g. A wizard with a 15 INT attempts a cantrip (0 level) so must roll a 15 or less to succeed. A roll of 16 - 19 results in a misfire. The same wizard then attempts to cast a 1st level spell (INT – 1 for the spell’s level) so must now roll a 14 or less to succeed. A roll of 15-19 is a misfire. Higher level magicks are inherently more difficult to execute but such is the price to pay for greater power.

If a "nat 20" is the result of the casting roll then the wizard has lost control of the magick. This is termed by some wizards as a botch. The character must attempt a saving throw v spells. If the save is successful, the spell simply misfires. But if the save is failed, the wizard has done something quite wrong and must deal with corruption. The DM will determine the results of the corruption as appropriate. N.B. Being a wizard is dangerous, not only as a profession during the Middle Ages, but for the power you're trying to wield!


Beware of Romans

With the arrival of the Romans in the year 43 AD, the gradual, decades long, conquest of the peoples of Britannia began. During the ensuing three-and-a-half centuries of occupation, the invaders enslaved and slew many of the leaders of the indigenous peoples who would not be cowed and virtually eradicated from the lands south of Caledonia the Celtic priesthood known as the druids.

As the druids passed, so too did much of their knowledge since theirs was an oral tradition, not codified in any known written form. The wizards of Britannia recognized the danger they faced and came together in secret. They went into hiding to preserve their knowledge of magick lest it also be destroyed. In time the practice of writing spells on scrolls was established in Britannia and scrolls were eventually compiled into tomes.
By the early 5th century the Roman Empire no longer sent reinforcements to defend its holdings in Britannia as it continued its decline towards collapse. The wizards and their knowledge of magick survived the Romans and evolved.


Dark Ages Enlightenment

While Britannia was seemingly consumed by conflict between squabbling warlords, Saxon incursions, Viking plunderers, and Norman conquerors, the wizards gained a greater understanding of magick. The greatest of the discoveries made during the time was the mana focus.

Mana is pervasive magickal power. Through extensive training during apprenticeship and by use of a focus device, a wand, a wizard may focus mana into a known spell effect (the spell must be in the wizard’s repertoire) without the need to prepare a spell in advance by way of a magickal imprint upon the mind.

The mana focus technique allows a wizard great flexibility to use known spells as desired until he reaches his daily mana limit. Additionally, the wand replaces the need for material components… though some exceptions will apply. Lastly, a wizard finds it easier to utilize magic when using a wand.

Other than his grimoire(s), aka spell book(s), a wizard's wand is one of his most prized possessions. Deprived of his wand, a wizard may not cast spells using the mana focus technique. Until the wizard regains his wand, or fashions a replacement, he must resort to the Vancian method and have access to his grimoire(s). The process for a wizard to create a wand is laborious and a closely guarded secret. Should a PC desire to create a new wand, the details will be handled between the player and the DM.

A person waving a wand and causing strange things to happen will be easily identified as a wizard / witch / warlock / sorcerer / etc. by those around him. Caution must be exercised by a wizard when casting spells lest unwanted attention be drawn to him.


Game Mechanics for Spell Casting with a Wand EDIT on 15-Aug-17

A wizard attempting to use his wand to cast a spell requires freedom of movement and the ability to verbalize. In order to successfully cast a spell using the mana focus technique, a casting roll is required. The use of the wand replaces the INT of the wizard with a value of 19. The casting roll is a d20 check with a penalty equal to the level of the spell subtracted from 19. E.g. A zero level cantrip succeeds on a roll of 1-19 (19 – 0 = 19). A 1st level spell succeeds on a roll of 1-18 (19 – 1 = 18), misfires on a 19, and botches on a nat 20. A 2nd level spell succeeds on a roll of 1-17 (19 – 2 = 17), misfires on an 18-19, and botches on a nat 20, etc. If the check passes, then the spell operates normally. If the check fails, then expend the mana and resolve the misfire or botch.

A spell’s cost in mana is equal to its level. Zero level spells, cantrips, are handled differently since they are so minor they don’t require a full point of mana to cast. A wizard is allotted a specific quantity of cantrips to use per day. Once they are expended they can’t be used until the wizard has rested, usually by getting a full night’s sleep. However, if a wizard desires, he may spend one mana point to replenish his daily allotment of cantrips. Be advised – mana is a limited daily resource!

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