A road less traveled...and for good reason.

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Cloak-n-Dagger
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A road less traveled...and for good reason.

Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:11 am

Very cool article, also nice to pick apart for adventure ideas.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2017011 ... in-britain
The Broomway is known as the most perilous path in Britain – and is a favourite walk of writer Robert Macfarlane, who describes it in this adaptation from his book The Old Ways.
B547452F-8B9B-4BBA-8E6A-553CDD8BAAE0.jpeg
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“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

Ancalagon
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Post by Ancalagon » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:42 pm

That's got me brain noodles spinnin'. Could definitely see adding that to Coeur de Lion.

Cloak-n-Dagger
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Post by Cloak-n-Dagger » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:47 pm

I love locations like this, another one that is actually more of a mystery, is the story about The Flannan Lighthouse. I actually thought this might make for a great Call of Cthulhu or even an AS&SH adventure. You can do a google search to find out more details about this, but the gist of it is as follows:
In December 1900, a boat called Hesperus set sail for the island of Eilean Mor, one of the seven islets (also known as the “Seven Hunters”) of the Flannan Isles off the coast of northwestern Scotland. Captain James Harvey was tasked with delivering a relief lighthouse keeper as part of a regular rotation. The journey was delayed a few days by bad weather, and when Harvey and his crew finally arrived, it was clear that something was awry. None of the normal preparations at the landing dock had been made, the flagstaff was bare, and none of the keepers came to greet the Hesperus. The keepers, as it turned out, weren’t on the island at all. All three of them had vanished.

What the Hesperus crew did find at the lighthouse was a set of perplexing clues. The replacement keeper, Joseph Moore, was the first to investigate, and reported an all-encompassing sense of dread as he ascended the cliff toward the newly constructed lighthouse. Inside, the kitchen table contained plates of meat, potatoes, and pickles. The clock was stopped, and there was an overturned chair nearby. The lamp was ready for lighting, and two of the three oilskin coats belonging to Thomas Marshall, James Ducat, and Donald McArthur were gone. The gate and door were firmly shut.

These clues only led to more questions. Why would one of the keepers have gone out without his coat—and for that matter, why would all three have left together at all when the rules forbade it? Someone needed to man the post at all times, so something unusual must have drawn them out. When Moore returned with his report, Harvey had the island searched. The hunt came up empty.

Further investigations also led nowhere, though the lighthouse log book provided a new set of confounding details. On December 12, an entry from Marshall described “severe winds the likes of which I have never seen before in twenty years.” He wrote that Ducat had been quiet and McArthur had been crying, which would have been odd behavior for a man with a reputation as a tough and experienced seafarer. The next day, Marshall reported more storm details and wrote that all three of them had been praying—another odd bit of behavior from well-seasoned keepers in a brand-new, supposedly safe lighthouse. Strangest of all, there were no reported storms in the area on December 12th, 13, or 14—all should have been calm up until December 17. The last report in the book, from December 15, read: “Storm ended, sea calm. God is over all.”
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“A man practices the art of adventure when he breaks the chain of routine and renews his life through reading new books, traveling to new places, making new friends, taking up new hobbies and adopting new viewpoints” ~ Wilfred Peterson, American Author

grodog
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Post by grodog » Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:38 pm

To read when I'm more consciously able to process words!

Allan.
grodog
----
Allan Grohe
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grodog@gmail.com
http://www.greyhawkonline.com/grodog/greyhawk.html for my Greyhawk site
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